(via with-outacause)

middle-shiner:

Raphael’s Madonna with Child

(via motiya)

(via aestheticheart)

#tru  

sweatyscrotum:

I’m not like other girls!XD

image

I only have guy friends. I mean all girls do is start drama.image

Oh my god, i hate sluts! image

Other girls my age like to drink and party but i like to stay inside and read or watch netflix! I’m so weird. image

All the girls in my school care about is makeup and shopping and all i care about is FOOD and VIDEO GAMES. lol sometimes i think i was born a guy.image

(via sexidance)

(via andthatlittleblackdress)

Honestly, I think that I cheer on anybody who is living their life on their own terms and wearing what they want to wear and representing what they want to represent. I think that no other female artist should be able to tell me to wear less clothes and I’m not gonna tell any other female artist to wear more clothes. You know what I’m saying? As long as it’s their idea, and they’re expressing their sexuality or they’re expressing their strength or it makes them feel like a woman to perform a certain way or dress a certain way. I just think that as long as it’s coming from them and they’re living their life on their own terms, I cheer them on. Honestly.

Taylor Swift on not “acting up” like Miley Cyrus and Brittney Spears (via immabefearless)

(via andthatlittleblackdress)

(via andthatlittleblackdress)

samkidanuengirl:

charlottesharks:

Barbapapa, photographer Isabelle Chapuis 

this is fuckin brilliant

(via murderous-moon)

#Fashion  #werk  

Early in my freshman year, my dad asked me if there were lots of Latinos at school. I wanted to say, “Pa, I’m one of the only Latinos in most of my classes. The other brown faces I see mostly are the landscapers’. I think of you when I see them sweating in the morning sun. I remember you were a landscaper when you first came to Illinois in the 1950s. And look, Pa! Now I’m in college!”

But I didn’t.

I just said, “No, Pa. There’s a few Latinos, mostly Puerto Rican, few Mexicans. But all the landscapers are Mexican.”

My dad responded, “¡Salúdelos, m’ijo!”

So when I walked by the Mexican men landscaping each morning, I said, “Buenos días.”

Recently, I realized what my dad really meant. I remembered learning the Mexican, or Latin American, tradition of greeting people when one enters a room. In my Mexican family, my parents taught me to be “bien educado” by greeting people who were in a room already when I entered. The tradition puts the responsibility of the person who arrives to greet those already there. If I didn’t follow the rule as a kid, my parents admonished me with a back handed slap on my back and the not-so-subtle hint: “¡Saluda!”

I caught myself tapping my 8-year-old son’s back the other day when he didn’t greet one of our friends: “Adrian! ¡Saluda!”

However, many of my white colleagues over the years followed a different tradition of ignorance. “Maleducados,” ol’ school Mexican grandmothers would call them.

But this Mexican tradition is not about the greeting—it’s about the acknowledgment. Greeting people when you enter a room is about acknowledging other people’s presence and showing them that you don’t consider yourself superior to them.

When I thought back to the conversation between my dad and me in 1990, I realized that my dad was not ordering me to greet the Mexican landscapers with a “Good morning.”

Instead, my father wanted me to acknowledge them, to always acknowledge people who work with their hands like he had done as a farm worker, a landscaper, a mechanic. My father with a 3rd grade education wanted me to work with my mind but never wanted me to think myself superior because I earned a college degree and others didn’t.

(via murderous-moon)

#Gifs  #ugh  

jcoleknowsbest:

supamuthafuckinvillain:

Lmfao the caption made it better

Lord I don died…

(via bad-dominicana)

#lmao  

notyourexrotic:

This week, India became the first Asian nation to reach Mars when its orbiter entered the planet’s orbit on Wednesday — and this is the picture that was seen around the world to mark this historic event. It shows a group of female scientists at the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) congratulating one another on the mission’s success. 

The picture was widely shared on Twitter where Egyptian journalist and women’s rights activist Mona El-Tahawy tweeted: “Love this pic so much. When was the last time u saw women scientists celebrate space mission?” 

In most mission room photos of historic space events or in films about space, women are rarely seen, making this photo both compelling and unique. Of course, ISRO, like many technical agencies, has far to go in terms of achieving gender balance in their workforce. As Rhitu Chatterjee of PRI’s The World observed in an op-ed, only 10 percent of ISRO’s engineers are female.

This fact, however, Chatterjee writes, is “why this new photograph of ISRO’s women scientists is invaluable. It shatters stereotypes about space research and Indian women. It forces society to acknowledge and appreciate the accomplishments of female scientists. And for little girls and young women seeing the picture, I hope it will broaden their horizons, giving them more options for what they can pursue and achieve.” 

To read Chatterjee’s op-ed on The World, visit http://bit.ly/1u3fvGZ

Photo credit: Manjunath Kiran/AFP/Getty Images

- A Mighty Girl

(via qunshan)

#India  #Feminism  

(via bingbag)

#tru  

latent:

fagbarbie:

steal her style: Ina Garten

denim shirt: woven from Egyptian grown cotton and died with the wildest indigo grown in South Carolina 

pearl earrings: gathered from the bottom of the Persian Gulf

tomatoes: picked fresh from the finest gardens in Italy during the winter’s harvest

but if you can’t store bought is fine

slangtang

(via blacknetizen)

#omg  #lmao  

teenagesoil:

Steal His Look: Mulder Running Fast

  • Paul Smith Mainline Green Raglan Sleeve Cotton Sweatshirt in Forest Green ($275 )

  • T by Alexander Wang Light Sweatshirt ($255)

  • Stella McCartney Wool and silk-blend track pants ($700)
  • Air Jordan 6 SPORT BLUE Photos Ad Infinitum ($170)

  • The pain of losing a sister at the age of 12 and an incessant need to find out the truth about her abduction and the existence of extraterrestrial life (Free) 

(via doughnutdisco)

#X-Files  #tru